Menstrual Narratives: The Story of Joyce (37 yo, Nairobi): “It used to soak through my pad even if I wore two. I had to sleep with a towel on my bed”

My story is interesting, when I was 12 my mother thought I had started my period. One day as I was riding my bike, I crushed into a wall and hit my vejay jay area really hard. Of course I went to my mum and told her that I was bleeding but neglected to tell her of the bike accident. Immediately my mum thought I had began my period. She asked me to take a bath and then showed me how to line my panty with a pad. She used some pads that she had in the house. Of course since I had not really started my period. I was not bleeding the next day. Then when I was 15 my period started while at boarding school. I did not have any pads but I told the other girls in my dorm and they were so helpful. They let me use their packet of pads. Since my mum had already explained to me about my period about 3 year prior and since most of the girls in the dorm were already having their period. I just felt that it was time for me as well. Thankfully there was no shame surrounding it. However when my period did finally come, it was extraordinarily heavy. It used to soak through my pad even if I wore two. I had to sleep with a towel on my bed. There was a lot of shame in this as I did not know what to do and I felt like there was something wrong with me. I suffered through it till my adulthood without really addressing it. As a result I am highly anemic. I wish I would have felt comfortable enough to talk even to my mother about it. In hindsight I know she would have helped but it is something I carried with me and dealt with on my own.

Engaging #Men&Boys to #EndVAWG (Violence Against Women and Girls) Tweetathon June 15-16, 2014

Dear Friends,

Join us! On Father’s Day (June 15th) and the Day of the African Child (June 16th) to highlight ways in which men and boys are engaged in and can mobilize to end/prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG). VAWG is a grave violation of human rights and bodily integrity, that not only affects the well-being of women, but their families, their community and country-causing greater healthcare/legal expenses, losses in productivity and overall development.

This conversation is a follow-up and a response to the following ongoing campaigns: #EndChildMarriageNow (Africa Union 2-yr campaign), #TimetoAct, #MenstruationMatters, #BringBackOurGirls, #JusticeforLiz, #WEA and #TheAfricaWeWant. This is also the first in our series to raise consciousness for gender equality using hashtags #Men&Boys to #EndVAWG.

We want to know how your country is engaging #Men&Boys to #EndVAWG | what the challenges are | why it is important to engage #Men&Boys? | And is violence against women and girls a #Men&Boys issue?

Join in from June 15-16 to engage in dialogue that illustrates the progress, challenges and solutions to #EndVAWG. Please use the hashtags: #Men&Boys and #EndVAWG on Twitter and Facebook. Find our social media toolkit here, and invite your friends on Facebook.

Importantly, to help us stay in touch with you, and improve the sustainability of #EndVAWG via #Men&Boys as allies, take 2 minutes to participate in this survey.

We look forward to engaging with you on Twitter and Facebook.

In Solidarity,

Joanne Oport, MPA | @awuoroport

Deborah Dauda, MA/MPH| LEPA_Initiative@LEPA_Initiative

Kennedy Otina | Men 2 Men Program, @FEMNETProg@jakateng

#EndVAWG #Men&Boys As Allies Flier June 15-16 2014