How do sanitary kits boost up the quality of girls education in Somalia?

Sahra Ahmed Koshin - Exploring, Researching and Documenting Gender Issues in Somalia.

How do sanitary kits boost up the quality of girls education in Somalia?

Sanitation is dignity. We come from a culture where we have never had sanitary kit packages. Menstruation was a personal and private matter and you were to seek your own solutions. Now we have factories developing kits for us. Now we have a choice. Having a choice is empowerment.

By Sahro Ahmed Koshin, Gender Technical Adviser at MoE Puntland and PhD Candidate ‘Gender in Education in Somalia’.

Contributing to efforts geared towards bridging the gender gap in the education sector in Puntland through lobby-oriented activism and professional writing.


Introduction and background

The CARE-led EU-funded Waxbarashada Waa Iftiin (WWI) Education project works closely with the Gender Unit of the Ministry of Education in Puntland. The WWI project strives, among others, to contribute to the overall achievement of one of the goals of education in the world; gender equity…

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Let’s Talk about Power, Violence and Men in Crisis

FEMNET

By Sam Rosmarin*

This week, hundreds of Kenyans marched in downtown Nairobi chanting “My Dress, My Choice” in response to recent violent public attacks on women. On the surface, these attacks focused on the indecent attire of the victims, while the march focused on the freedom of women to dress how they please. While I laud the marchers for putting this issue into the public space, I can’t help but think their slogans are misguided. By centering their slogans on dress, the activists allowed Kenya to slip into the wrong conversation: a debate on morality and appropriate attire.

These conversations aren’t inherently bad, but I believe they are wasted opportunities to confront the real issues of power and violence.

When a mob of men strips a woman naked for being “indecent” in public, this is an act of power not morality. Let’s be honest: if it were truly…

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In Search Of The Menstruating Goddess

Mythri Speaks

When it comes to conversations around Menstrual Taboos, usually there are two strong view-points: One which says that it is all rubbish and we need to set women who follow these taboos “free”. Another, equally strong but externally silent viewpoint says that we should never stop following what women in our families have done for generations. The two view-points do not meet and usually have no tolerance for the other.

In our stubbornness to prove what we wish to be true, we rarely look at the rituals for what they are. Rituals and taboos are only external forms of some belief. They are either good or bad depending on the belief that gave birth to the ritual. Sadly, the most commonly heard beliefs around the menstrual rituals are negative, hinting at menstruation as being impure. And therefore, the rituals that arise from this negativity cause more harm than good.

But…

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#MenstrualNarratives: The Story of Irene (58yo, Durban, South Africa) “My mother however was not as open as my Dad and she did have certain prejudices towards menstruation that it was something to be borne and endured and it was a hassle”

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I remember having a very serious talk with my dad about the special gift that ladies had to give to a man and that was one’s virginity. I remember then getting into discussion about sex and pregnancy and babies and marriage, but I was not yet menstruating. However I did have an older sister with whom I shared a bedroom so I had first hand experience of her first menstrual period.

So when it came to mine although it was a shock and I felt afraid of what was happening to my body I had a sister, mother and father with whom I could talk. My mother however was not as open as my Dad and she did have certain prejudices towards menstruation – that it was something to be borne and endured and it was a hassle and men were more fortunate that women etc.

It was a scarey experience but I was able to get support and assistance both at home and at school so the adjustment was quick and easy.

However, much later on in life I came across a book that suggested a totally different perspective on the menstrual cycle in that one should celebrate one’s fertility and it had a prayer that one could say in thanksgiving for the privilege of being able to be fertile. If I can find it I will share it on this site.

#MenstrualNarratives-The Story of Abee (25yo, Trincomalee, Sri Lanka) “I told to mother when I got my first menstruation and of course it was a celebration in my society”

According to my community, the age of 16 was too late to get menstruation. Therefore, I have already aware of menstruation from my mother’s instruction and it was a part of my education in intermediate level. I told to mother when I got my first menstruation and of course it was a celebration in my society. I was not allowed to see any men from outside and I was not allowed to go out for a month. I kept in side my room and fed by healthy and nutrition food. Then after a month. I had puberty ceremony, where so many relatives attended.