The Story of Anita Afonu (27yo: Accra): A huge Lump Travel from my Tubes and….Down my Uterus and Stop!

Menstruating for the first time was a very daunting experience. It wasn’t weird because I knew nothing about it, it was weird because I was a bit too over grown when it happened. I was in Secondary school. An all girls secondary school. In my first year. Still a teenager, contemplating life and why I was alive at all. I hated my school, partly because it wasn’t the school I wanted to be at. My mother had forced me there because it was her alma mater and I was at serious loggerheads with her for sending me to that school. I was undergoing a serious sexual orientation issues and at some point in my life felt I was a boy trapped in a woman’s body. I couldn’t relate with many of the girls there because they had conversations I couldn’t have. They liked to have conversations about boys, menstrual cramps and Elle magazine. I wanted to discuss films, politics and literature.

So it was one of those days, a Monday to be precise. I had turned 17 about 8 months ago. It was time for math class. Oh how I hated math class. In fact, anything that had to do with numbers, I stayed away from. Mr Owusu was there rambling about an equation when all of a sudden I felt a huge lump travel from my tubes and sort of make its way down my uterus and stop. It felt funny, but I didn’t know how to react. Within a few minutes I felt wet and a slight sharp pain. Not sure what it was, I excused myself and run to the bathroom. I took off my underwear only to realize the horror. Red! It was blood. Oh My God! I shrieked. This cant be it, this cant be it. Not knowing what to do, I run back to class to talk to Victoria. Victoria was a no-nonsense girl, I have to say. She took crap from no one but had a very loving side to her. She was very slim with curly hair and was light skinned. When I informed Victoria, she immediately summoned her two side kicks, Sally and Sena. They lined up in front of me in the bathroom and took a serious look at me as if I were in the military. She ordered to see if it was true and when she did, she looked at me with such incredulity and said; ‘Oh Anita, what took you so long?’ Immediately, Sally hugged me so tight and so did Sena. They put me in the shower, helped me clean up and taught me how to use a sanitary towel. I had seen many women from Reproductive health organizations come to our school to tell us about how to use sanitary towels and all but I had never paid any attention to them because I just didn’t care. I hadn’t menstruated so why should I care?

Victoria, being the boss of all of us, assumed her role and taught me step by step how to wear a sanitary towel and what it means when I don’t menstruate. She taught me how to walk and what to do when I experience menstrual cramps. In that moment, I missed my mother. Not because I wanted to share with her this ‘joyful’ discovery, but to let her know that I am sorry. That I was sorry for hating her so much. In that moment, I needed her to assure me that there was nothing to fear, that there was nothing to worry about. That I will be fine. I felt she didn’t understand me, that she didn’t understand how I felt. Now, as I write this, its another time of the month. I am experiencing menstrual cramps as always, but I am grateful to Victoria, Sally and Sena all three of whom spent the remaining two years of High School with me, teaching me about boys and how to take care of myself and how to appreciate my womanhood. For me, menstruating was one major turning point in my life, in that it will be a constant reminder of two things, that I am not pregnant and the fact that I was a woman.

#MenstruationMatters Tweetathon. May 28. Celebrate First Menstrual Hygiene Day-Together We Can #BreakTheSilence

Join #MenstruationMatters  Tweetathon in celebrating Menstrual Hygiene Day. Hosted by LEPA Initiative  FEMNET & The Red Elephant Foundation. In Your Respective Time Zones All Day on May 28, 2014
We welcome reflections and posts on facebook, poems, songs, blog posts, articles, photos and more on Why #MenstruationMatters to you and tag it with #MenstruationMatters or #BreakTheSilence. If possible, send us a link, or post directly on LEPA Initiative facebook page. Find more information  about Menstrual Hygiene Day here – as well as a social media mapping to help target your messages. Looking forward to engaging with you online.
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Let’s Start The Conversation About Menstruation-May 28 is Menstrual Hygiene Day

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Why a ‘Menstrual Hygiene Day’?

Menstrual Hygiene Day was created to publicly recognize the right of women to hygienically manage their menstruation wherever they are. By acknowledging that menstruation is a normal human process and a sign of good health, Menstrual Hygiene Day confronts the stigmas attached to menstruation with collective advocacy, education and action.

What does ‘Menstrual Hygiene Day’ want to achieve?

Menstrual Hygiene Day aims to help break the silence and raise awareness about the importance of menstrual hygiene management. The long-term goal is to have Menstrual Hygiene Day become an official UN Day by year 2020.

Who supports ‘Menstrual Hygiene Day’?

MH Day has brought together over 80 partners from social businesses, NGOs, advocates, academia and other influential sectors.

When is ‘Menstrual Hygiene Day’?

Menstrual Hygiene Day is on May 28th and will be celebrated in 2014 for the first time. The number 28 refers to the average days of the menstrual cycle, and 5 refers to the average amount of days a woman or girl experiences menstruation in a month.

What will happen on ‘Menstrual Hygiene Day’?

From small villages to big cities, Menstrual Hygiene Day will be celebrated in places such as Berlin, Delhi, Kathmandu, Nairobi and more, with exhibitions, meetings and trainings.

Want to know more?

Visit http://www.menstrualhygieneday.org